Minimally Invasive Surgery

Hiatal Hernia

A hiatal hernia occurs when the upper part of the stomach pushes up into the chest through a small opening in the diaphragm, the muscle that separates the abdomen from the chest.

Incisional Hernia

Incisional hernias occur at or in close proximity to a surgical incision through which intestinal or other tissue protrudes. All abdominal surgery carries the risk of a postoperative incisional hernia due to a weakening of the muscle from the incision.

Inguinal Hernia

Inguinal hernias are the most common type of hernia. An inguinal hernia occurs in the groin area, where a section of intestine pushes through a weak spot in the inguinal canal—a triangle-shaped opening between layers of abdominal muscle.

Umbilical Hernia

An umbilical hernia occurs at the umbilicus (belly button) when a loop of intestine pushes through the umbilical ring, a small opening in a fetus’ abdominal muscles through which the umbilical cord passes.

Ventral (Abdominal) Hernia

A ventral (abdominal) hernia is any protrusion of intestine or other tissue through a weakness or gap in the anterior abdominal wall. Umbilical and incisional hernias are specific and common types of ventral hernias.

Gallstones Surgery

Cholecystectomy is surgery to remove your gallbladder. It is the only treatment option to cure symptomatic gallstones. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the most common procedure instead of a traditional, open procedure.

Reflux Surgery

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a common condition in which the gastric contents move up into the oesophagus. Reflux becomes a disease when it causes frequent or severe symptoms or injury to the patient.